FC Barcelona

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FC Barcelona

Post  ElPaso on Thu Jun 10, 2010 10:26 am

The second best Soccer club team in the world.

HISTORY OF FC BARCELONA

On November 29, 1899, Hans Gamper founded Futbol Club Barcelona, along with eleven other enthusiasts of 'foot-ball', a game that was still largely unknown in this part of the world.


He could never have imagined the magnitude of what that initiative would eventually develop into. Over more than one hundred years of history, FC Barcelona has grown spectacularly in every area and has progressed into something much greater than a mere sports club, turning Barça’s ‘more than a club’ slogan into a reality.

Barça has become, for millions of people all around the world, a symbol of their identity, and not just in a sporting sense, but also in terms of society, politics and culture. Throughout the most difficult of times, Barça was the standard that represented Catalonia and the Catalan people's desire for freedom, a symbolism that has continued to be closely linked to the idiosyncrasy of the Club and its members to this day. Within the context of Spain, Barça is seen as an open and democratic club. And all around the world, Barça is identified with caring causes, and most especially children through its sponsorship agreement with Unicef.

For a whole century, FC Barcelona has passed through moments of glory and pain, periods of brilliance and other less successful ones, epic victories and humbling defeats. But all these different moments have helped define the personality of a Club that, due to its peculiar nature, is considered unique in the world.

With over one hundred years of history, there have naturally been many different periods, both in a social and a sporting sense. In the early years (1899-1922) , from the foundation of the club to the construction of Les Corts stadium, Barça was a club that had to distinguish itself from all the other football teams in Barcelona, to the point that it would come to be identified with the city as a whole. Barça soon became the leading club in Catalonia, and also associated itself with the increasingly growing sense of Catalan national identity.

From Les Corts to the Camp Nou (1922-1957), the club went through contrasting periods. Its membership reached 10,000 for the first time, while football developed into a mass phenomenon and turned professional, and these were the years of such legendary figures as Alcántara and Samitier. But due to material difficulties and the political troubles of the Spanish Civil War and post-war period, the club was forced to overcome several adverse circumstances, including the assassination of president Josep Sunyol in 1936, the very person who had propagated the slogan ‘sport and citizenship'. But the club survived, and a period of social and sporting recovery materialised in the form of the Camp Nou, coinciding with the arrival of the hugely influential Ladislau Kubala.

From the construction of the Camp Nou to the 75th anniversary (1957-1974) , Barça suffered mediocre results but was consolidated as an entity, with a constantly increasing membership and the slow but steady recovery, in the face of adversity, of its identity. A very clear sensation that was manifested for the first time ever in the words ‘Barça, more than a club’ proclaimed by president Narcís de Carreras. The board presided by Agustí Montal brought a player to Barcelona who would change the history of the club, Johan Cruyff.

From the 7th anniversary to the European Cup (1974-1992) the club saw the conversion of football clubs to democracy, the start of Josep Lluís Núñez’s long presidency, the extension of the Camp Nou on occasion of the 1982 World Cup and the Cup Winners Cup triumph in Basle (1979), a major success not just in a sporting sense but also in a social one, with an enormous and exemplary expedition of Barça supporters demonstrating to Europe the unity of the Barcelona and Catalan flags. Cruyff returned, this time as coach, and created what would come to be known as the 'Dream Team' (1990-1994), whose crowning glory was the conquest of the European Cup at Wembley (1992), thanks to Koeman’s famous goal.

International Dominance. From Wembley to Abu Dhabi (1992-2009) was when the club’s most recent developments occurred in between its three greatest achievements, becoming champions of Europe. Josep Lluís Núñez’s long presidency came to an end, and the club displayed its finest potential during the celebrations of the club Centenary. Following on from Joan Gaspart (2000-2003), the June 2003 election brought Joan Laporta into office, and the start of new social expansion, reaching 172,938 members, and more successes on the pitch, including four league titles, the Champions League titles won in Paris and Rome and the FIFA Club World Cup.

In the season 2008-09 the arrival of Josep Guardiola as first team coach brought new energy to the club and they recorded the most successful season in their entire history winning the six titles that will be forever burned into the memories of all Barça fans. Success on the field has helped the club expand its social role and heighten its media profile. In the 2009/10 season, Guardiola’s second in charge, the Liga title was won for the second year in a row, and the twentieth on club history, setting a new record of 99 points in the process. The title was not decided until the very last day, with a game against Valladolid, and the celebrations went ahead that very same evening in the company of the fans at the Camp Nou.

The grandeur of Futbol Club Barcelona is explained, among many other factors, by its impressive honours list. Very few clubs anywhere in the world have won so many titles. The Intercontinental Cup is the only major football trophy that has never made its way into the club museum, where the club's greatest pride and joy remain the three European Cup titles won in Wembley (1992) Paris (2006), Rome (2009) and the FIFA Club World Cup in 2009.

Apart from winning Europe’s top title,, the Club also has the honour of being the only one to have appeared in every single edition of European club competition since the tournaments were first created back in 1955. Barcelona's many achievements in Europe include being considered 'King of the Cup Winners Cup', having won that title a record four times

In addition, FC Barcelona also won three Fairs Cups (the tournament now known as the UEFA Cup) in 1958, 1960 and 1966. In 1971, Barça won that trophy outright in a match played between themselves, as the first ever winners of the competition, and Leeds United, as the last.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  ElPaso on Thu Jun 10, 2010 10:31 am



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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  CE on Thu Jun 10, 2010 10:42 am

Meh, can't be bothered with them. Viva Celtic.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Thu Jun 10, 2010 10:42 am

brilliant thread El Paso.

"mas que un club" sums them up really, they're an institution and a fantastic example of how to play football and how to run a club. having a charity as your sponsor is a superb gesture.

the 4 in a row team played some outstanding football, and had some of the best players in the world but even they cant come close to the current team. the halrem globetrotters of football.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  ElPaso on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:11 pm

clagan wrote:brilliant thread El Paso.

"mas que un club" sums them up really, they're an institution and a fantastic example of how to play football and how to run a club. having a charity as your sponsor is a superb gesture.

the 4 in a row team played some outstanding football, and had some of the best players in the world but even they cant come close to the current team. the halrem globetrotters of football.

theres a great book i have on barca clags..must root it out.. think its by jimmy burns..great fuckin read it is.
Ill never forget watching schuster play for barca in my first visit to the nou camp as a wean. it was barca v athletico madrid ...the golden locks of schuster blowing in the wind as he dominated the game with consemate ease , no easy feat considering the other world world class players on the park. Lineker was playing for barca at that time too. Ive been back twice since , but that experience has stayed with me. i remember , being overwhelmed by the comradary between the barca fans and my da and I. He obviously wasnt surprised , but I was only a gassun and wasnt used to mingling with 'other' teams in such circumstances. I quickly learned. Still have the pictures of us in the hoops at the nou camp with random catalans who made us feel very welcome in their home. The similarities between barca and us is undeniable.
''more than just a club..''

(good read below if you have 5 mins)

mon barca.

Founded in 1899, when the Swiss-born Hans Gamper established a team made up of Swiss, English and Catalan players, the club quickly established itself as a focal point of the city and the region. Gamper is an integral part of the early history of the club – scoring103 goals between 1901 and 1903 and then becoming the president until his death in 1930. It was he who enabled the club to purchase their first ground in 1909, with a capacity of just 6,000 people. Gamper then oversaw the development of the Les Corts stadium, initially with room for 30,000 although it was later doubled in size. And, the year before his death, he was able to see his club become the first ever Spanish League champions. By this time, with in excess of 10,000 members, Barcelona was already attracting star footballers from overseas – the Uruguayan striker Hector Scarone being the first of many ‘big money’ signings. Perhaps the most famous of Barcelona’s players in this era, however, was the goalkeeper Ricardo Zamora. Zamora is remembered today for mainly two reasons. Firstly, he has given his name to the trophy awarded to the best goalkeeper in La Liga each season. And secondly, he was the first player to tread that dangerous transfer path from Barcelona to Real Madrid!

The notorious and long standing rivalry between Spain’s two major teams has always been keenly felt. This came to a head, of course, during the Franco era. Barcelona, as now, was the emblematic capital of the region of Catalonia and Franco banned both the Catalan flag and its language. FC Barcelona became the only place where large groups of people could gather and speak in their native language and the claret and blue of Barcelona became a recognisable substitute for the red and yellow of Catalonia. Josep Suñol, the president at the time, was murdered by the military in 1936 and a bomb was dropped on the FC Barcelona social club in 1938. Football-wise, things probably reached their nadir in 1941 when Barcelona were ‘instructed’ to lose a match to Real Madrid. They did, in fact, lose the match by 11 goals to 1 in protest – and then saw their goalkeeper banned from football for the rest of his life.

During the 1950s and 60s, of course, Barca were somewhat overshadowed by the famous Real Madrid team of Puskas, Di Stefano et al, but they still managed to win the league four times in the fifties. The sixties, however, were a much more difficult time for the club, just winning the Spanish Cup in 1963 and 1968 and the Inter City Fairs’ Cup – later to become the UEFA Cup – in 1966.

In 1973, though, the legend that was Johan Cruyff joined the club from Ajax, stating that he chose Barca in preference to Madrid because he could never play for a club associated with Franco. Alongside his compatriot Johan Neeskens, they immediately took the club to their first title for 14 years – defeating Real Madrid 5 – 0 at the Bernabéu in the process. Cruyff was pronounced European Footballer of the Year and gave his son a Catalan name, Jordi; his iconic status was now forever assured. By the time the club’s 75th anniversary came round, there were now 70,000 members and the Camp Nou Stadium, which had opened in 1957, was full to its 90,000 capacity every home game.

Josep Lluís Núñez was elected club president in 1978, a post he was to keep until the end of the millennium. It was he who brought great financial stability and supreme overseas players to the Camp Nou. Players such as Diego Maradona, Bernd Schuster, Gary Lineker, Ronaldo, Gheorghe Hagi, Ronald Koeman, Michael Laudrup, Mark Hughes, Hristo Stoikov, Romário, Rivaldo and Luis Figo – not many defenders there, you’ll notice – and managers such as César Luis Menotti, Terry Venables, Luis Aragonés, Bobby Robson and, most successfully, Cruyff himself, all brought continued success in the form of league titles in 1985, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1998 and 1999; Copa del Rey victories in 1978, 1981, 1983, 1988, 1990, 1997 and 1998; Spanish Supercups in 1983, 1991, 1992, 1994 and 1996; the UEFA Champions League in 1992 and runners up in 1994; the UEFA Cup in 1979, 1982, 1989 and 1997; and the European Super Cup in 1992 and 1997.

In 1999, the club celebrated its centenary year by winning La Liga and Rivaldo, playing at his absolute peak, became the fourth Barca player to be voted European Footballer of the Year but the first three years of the next century saw something of a decline in fortunes on the pitch, epitomised by the departure of the club’s idol, Luis Figo, to Real Madrid. Few players have received receptions at their former grounds that can match those given to Figo when he returned to the Camp Nou.

In 2003, however, a new, young and politically astute president, Joan Laporta, took the helm at Barcelona and, with his appointment of Frank Rijkaard as manager, the club enjoyed a time of great success. By signing some of the world’s very best players – Ronaldinho, Deco, Eto’o and Messi - and combining them with a strong Catalan influence from the likes of Puyol, Iniesta, Xavi and Valdés, Barca were able to not only win La Liga but also, in 2005-2006, the UEFA Champions League. Highlights of this exciting era were the Larsson inspired victory over Arsenal and an amazing evening in Madrid when, after as comprehensive a 3 – 0 away win as you could ever see, the Real Madrid fans rose in unison to acclaim the unbelievable Ronaldinho.
Unfortunately, for ‘Los Cules’, the seemingly insulting nickname for Barcelona fans, things have not gone as well since. Internal divisions, which began to emerge during 2006 – 2007, really came to the fore during the following season, leading to the departure of Rijkaard and the break up of his squad. The fans are called Los Cules, by the way, not in an insulting manner – it means ‘backside’ but simply refers to the fact that, when people were sitting at the top of the stadium, their backsides all people in the streets below could see.

Readers who want to learn more of the history of this fascinating institution, can do no better than get hold of a copy of Jimmy Burns’ eminently readable book, Barca.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  Ryan67 on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:15 pm

"Celtic, like Barcelona, are more than a football club. Our clubs are a symbol of a culture and community that has not always been made welcome in their respective countries."
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:23 pm

cracking wee read mate, cheers. learned alot of stuff in it, surprised they won the leage 4 times during the 50's.

the preserving catalan culture during Franco's era reminds me of the GAA and as you say there's alot of similarities between the Barca and Celtic.

i've been in the nou camp twice, once for a match once for a game and its unreal.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  dermy21 on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:27 pm

Always had a thing for Barca tbh. My mates often ask me who I would support if Celtic hadn't existed and I have to say it would be Barca.

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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  ElPaso on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:32 pm

clagan wrote:cracking wee read mate, cheers. learned alot of stuff in it, surprised they won the leage 4 times during the 50's.

the preserving catalan culture during Franco's era reminds me of the GAA and as you say there's alot of similarities between the Barca and Celtic.

i've been in the nou camp twice, once for a match once for a game and its unreal.

yeah , bloody sunday 1920 does come to mind. as this article says...''a stadium full of innocent people is an easy target...very similar to Francos attack in the nou camp 1938''

The Dublin football team was scheduled to play Tipperary, in Croke Park, on the 21st of November 1920; the proceeds of this ‘great challenge match’ to be donated to the Irish Republican Prisoners Fund.

The night before Michael Collins sent his ‘Squad’ out to assassinate the ‘Cairo Gang’, a team of undercover British agents working and living in Dublin. A series of shootings took place throughout the night which left 14 members of the British Forces dead.

The Crown Forces, led by the Auxiliaries (and supported by the ‘Black and Tans’) mobilised in Dublin on the morning of the match with orders to go to Croke Park and search the crowd for known gunmen and weapons.

Throw-in for the match was scheduled for 2.45p.m. but when three I.R.A. men, Sean Russell, Tom Kilcoyne and Harry Colley, were informed (by their contacts) of the planned search of Croke Park they came to Croke Park and pleaded with Luke O’Toole, General Secretary of the G.A.A., to cancel the match.

O’Toole took the decision not to cancel the match; the mood in Dublin, and the Stadium, was very tense, rumours of the previous nights exploits were circulating amongst the crowd and thoughts of reprisals must have been prominent in peoples minds. O’Toole judged that any announcement to clear the stadium would lead to a panic induced exodus amongst the 10,000 strong crowd and that a crush could develop at the turnstiles.

Mick Sammon, the Kildare referee, threw in the ball at 3.15p.m. Accounts given by eye-witnesses suggest that five minutes after the throw-in the stadium was raided by the British forces with the shooting breaking out almost immediately. The British had entered the stadium at the Canal End and when the shooting began the crowd surged away from that end of the stadium hoping to make it over the wall at the railway end of the stadium.

Ultimately fourteen people lost their lives as a result of the shooting in Croke Park that day. Included in the dead were Michael Hogan, a player on the Tipperary Team (whom the Hogan Stand is named after); Thomas Ryan, shot on his knees whispering an act of contrition to Hogan; Jane Boyle, due to be married five days later and fourteen year old William Scott, so badly mutilated that it was at first thought he had been bayoneted to death.

Two military enquiries were established into the shootings and the findings of these enquiries, made public in 2003, are the main primary source for the events of that day. Strangely the main historical records of the Association, (the Central Council minute books), make no reference whatsoever to Bloody Sunday.

The findings of the enquiry and the statements released by Dublin Castle often contradict one another. In a series of ‘official statements‘ the British Authorities offered three possible scenarios for the bloodshed; the first being that the raiding party returned fire at I.R.A. pickets placed outside Croke Park; the second being that the raiding party came under fire in the ground itself while the third explanation was that upon the raiding party’s arrival three warning shots were fired by an I.R.A. man in the crowd and this caused a stampede. In all Dublin Castle scenarios however one thing is constant, the British had come under fire first.

Almost immediately serious doubts were expressed about the official version of events; the media picked glaring holes in the Dublin Castle statements; in particular their claims about I.R.A. pickets outside the ground, were these not unofficial ticket sellers, a common match-day feature. One claim made by Dublin Castle, that 30 revolvers had been found in the stadium, caused particular annoyance amongst the public and the media who begged the question; if thirty arms were found why were they not presented to the enquiry and why was no-one arrested when found with a gun. The purported aim of the raid was, after-all, to search for guns and gunmen.

The events of the day had a profound impact on the people of Ireland; it seemed as if the British authorities had deliberately chosen an easy target-a stadium full of innocent people-to exact revenge for a military loss suffered the night before.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:35 pm

dermy21 wrote:Always had a thing for Barca tbh. My mates often ask me who I would support if Celtic hadn't existed and I have to say it would be Barca.

what about Donegal Celtic?
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  dermy21 on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:36 pm

haha use to play under 10's for them then I got into the GAA, here we need to start that thread over here!!!

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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:43 pm

that was one of the most appalling acts of the struggle El Paso. complete and utter disgrace. showed them for what they really are.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  ElPaso on Thu Jun 10, 2010 5:47 pm

Ryan67 wrote:"Celtic, like Barcelona, are more than a football club. Our clubs are a symbol of a culture and community that has not always been made welcome in their respective countries."

and that from a Barcelona player. Its great to see the knowledge of Xavi extends beyond the football pitch.
What a player. Great quote from him too.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  niall on Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:38 am

love barca and all they stand for. May get their new shirt
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:53 am

niall wrote:love barca and all they stand for. May get their new shirt

just dont get "Ibra" on the back, he's getting alot of stick atm so i wouldn't be surprised if he's out the door although only Man City could affors him.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  niall on Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:55 am

gonna have to find that book
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  niall on Fri Jun 11, 2010 4:58 am

clagan wrote:
niall wrote:love barca and all they stand for. May get their new shirt

just dont get "Ibra" on the back, he's getting alot of stick atm so i wouldn't be surprised if he's out the door although only Man City could affors him.

no no. Villa
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  niall on Fri Jun 11, 2010 4:58 am

clagan wrote:

i've been in the nou camp twice, once for a match once for a game and its unreal.

haha, just noticed this. Whats the difference between a game and a match?
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  Fat Tony 10 Cocks on Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:09 am

great club but i think stenhousemuir just edge them
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:15 am

niall wrote:
clagan wrote:

i've been in the nou camp twice, once for a match once for a game and its unreal.

haha, just noticed this. Whats the difference between a game and a match?

PMSL i meant to say once for a match and once for a tour
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:17 am

Fat Tony 10 Cocks wrote:great club but i think stenhousemuir just edge them

you've obviously never had the pleasure of watching Chimney Corner FC, pride of Antrim.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  Fat Tony 10 Cocks on Fri Jun 11, 2010 5:21 am

clagan wrote:
Fat Tony 10 Cocks wrote:great club but i think stenhousemuir just edge them

you've obviously never had the pleasure of watching Chimney Corner FC, pride of Antrim.

......i thought i was the only one

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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  ElPaso on Sun Jun 13, 2010 6:49 pm

Sandro Rosell has been confirmed as the new president of Barcelona after receiving more than 61% of the vote in today's elections.

A poll by TV3 and Radio Catalunya had earlier revealed the 46 year-old to be the runaway leader in the race to succeed Joan Laporta.

The former Barca vice-president scooped 61.34% of the overall share, having been voted in by more than 35,000 socios.

Agusti Benedito came second, with 14.09% of the vote followed by Marc Ingla (12.29%) and Jaume Ferrer (10.80%).

Barca's honorary president Johan Cruyff voted, as did coach Pep Guardiola.

"This dream has been made possible by many people," Rosell said.

"All of those that have voted, whoever they voted for, also my family, my friends and all of the volunteers who have supported me in my candidacy - thank you."

Rosell served as vice-president under Laporta for two years, but resigned in 2005 because he believed the Barca chief was failing to stick to his original model for the running of the club.

Rosell was key to bringing players such as Ronaldinho and Deco to the club and has remained popular with fans.

And, despite his differences with Laporta, the new president has stressed Barca will come first.

"From tomorrow we will all have to row in the same direction," he said upon casting his vote earlier today.

Rosell will now have to work with Laporta in a two-week handover period, but expects no problems.

"It will be a smooth transition," he said earlier this week.

Past differences certainly appeared to have been forgotten as Rosell and Laporta shared an emotional hug following the announcement of the presidential results.

Laporta took over as president from Joan Gaspart in 2003, but failed to fulfil his election pledge of bringing David Beckham to the Nou Camp.

That deal failed to materialise as the former England captain opted to join Real Madrid, but Laporta's decision to sign Ronaldinho proved an ever better move as Barcelona, following a trophyless first season, went on to win two league titles and a Champions League crown under coach Frank Rijkaard, also appointed by Laporta.

The Barca president survived a confidence vote after two years without a trophy as Rijkaard lost control of the dressing room and Ronaldinho lost his shape.

But success on the field returned under Guardiola, who has led the club to seven trophies in two seasons, including all six on offer in 2009.

In Laporta's time in office, Barca have won 12 trophies in all, making the 47-year-old the club's most successful president ever.

Off the pitch, however, the lawyer has had his critics.

Laporta has been accused of mixing the club with his own political agenda as well as using the Barca brand for his own personal gain. But the president says he will leave with his conscience clear.

"I am happy - I leave with the sensation of having accomplished my mission," he said after casting his vote.
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  niall on Mon Jun 14, 2010 2:28 am

wonder will they sign fabregas?
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Re: FC Barcelona

Post  clagan on Mon Jun 14, 2010 2:29 am

61.34% is a bit of a landslide. lets hope his first job is signing Fabregas, he was born to play for Barca.
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